Vasectomy reversal

Reversal of male sterilisation

​Reversing a vasectomy can restore your fertility by rejoining the vas deferns tubes that were cut during a vasectomy

What is a vasectomy reversal?

This a procedure for someone who has already had a vasectomy which involves cutting and sealing your vas deferens — the tubes that carry the sperm from your testicles. This prevents sperm from mixing with your semen. Vasectomy reversal surgery is a delicate procedure to rejoin these tubes and allow sperm to flow through them, reversing the actions of the original vasectomy procedure.

Need to know

  • What happens during a vasectomy? icon plus

    Vasectomy reversal surgery is usually done under general anaesthetic. Your surgeon will make a small cut on each side of your scrotum, allowing them to examine the sealed vas deferens and remove any scar tissue. They'll check that the tubes still contain fluid from the testicles.

    If fluid is still present they will use a technique called vasovasotomy to rejoin the tubes using a microscope and tiny stitches.
    If your surgeon finds that the tubes are 'dry', they'll use a technique called vasoepididymostomy to attach them directly to the tubes that collect sperm in each testicle.

    The procedure can take up to two hours and you will need to stay in hospital for a day or sometimes overnight.

    It's not always possible for a vasectomy reversal to fully restore your fertility. If you and your partner find it difficult to conceive, it may be possible to retrieve sperm directly from your testicles for IVF treatment. Your consultant will explain your options to you.
  • How to prepare icon plus

    Your consultant will explain the procedure to you and answer any questions you may have. Because you'll be having general anaesthetic, they'll let you know how long you need to avoid eating and drinking before the procedure. Like all procedures, there may be some risks and side effects involved. Your consultant will explain these to you.
  • After surgery icon plus

    You'll usually be able to go home the same day as your procedure. It's normal to feel some discomfort or tenderness in the area for a few days following surgery. Your consultant will recommend some things you can do to stay as comfortable as possible, such as wearing supportive underwear.

    Your consultant will advise you of the length of recovery and let you  know when you can get back to your usual routine, including work. 

Don't wait, pay for yourself

We offer this treatment at a fixed price at some of our facilities.

Fertility treatment at the Lister Fertility Clinic

Vasectomy reversal may be offered by our urologists in conjunction with a surgical sperm retrieval procedure.

The key factors that decide whether to attempt a reversal or proceed straight to assisted reproduction with ICSI are:

  • the age of the female partner
  • the time since the vasectomy procedure

Although the time since vasectomy does not affect the chances of successful fertility treatment with surgically retrieved sperm, it does significantly impact on the chances of a successful vasectomy reversal.

One study has demonstrated over 70% pregnancy success if performed within three years of the original vasectomy; this drops to 50% or less thereafter. If there has been an extended period since the original vasectomy or if maternal age has increased, the Lister Fertility Clinic would recommend assisted reproduction as first-line treatment.

Our urologists

We’re proud to work with leading urological surgeons specialising in all areas of the testes. Our consultants ensure they discuss the full extent of the procedure and any fertility queries you may have. 

Our locations

From complex urological surgery to diagnostic tests and procedures, we provide exceptional urology care across our network of hospitals, outpatient centres and specialist clinics.

Request an appointment

Our team can help with any enquiries or you make an appointment with one of our experienced consultants.

Call us today

020 7079 4344
This content is intended for general information only and does not replace the need for personal advice from a qualified health professional.
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