Breast ultrasound

Imaging technique used to screen for breast abnormalities.

A type of scan that uses high-frequency sound waves to create a detailed image of your breast tissue.

About breast ultrasound

An ultrasound is often carried out when a lump or change in the breast is felt or an abnormality is detected on a mammogram. This will often provide valuable additional information about the nature and cause of the abnormality. 

An ultrasound may also be used if you have dense breast tissue, are under the age of 35, or are pregnant. Ultrasound is non-invasive and does not use ionizing radiation.

Need to know

  • What happens during a breast ultrasound? icon plus

    Breast ultrasound is carried out by a HCA specialist consultant breast radiologist. You will be asked to lie on your back, before a small amount of gel is applied to the area to be scanned. A transducer (handheld device) is pressed against the gelled area, and moved back and forth. The transducer emits high-frequency sound waves, which reflect off breast tissues beneath your skin to create a detailed image on the screen. The entire process will take less than half an hour to complete. It does not hurt and there are no known risks.

     

     

  • How to prepare for a breast ultrasound icon plus

    There are no special preparations for a breast ultrasound. It is normally carried out as an outpatient procedure, which means you will not stay overnight in hospital. You should be able to go home straight after.
  • What happens after a breast ultrasound? icon plus

    After having your ultrasound you can return to normal daily activities. The radiologist will review your imaging and will discuss the findings with you. A report will be sent to your referring consultant or GP. 

Our consultants

From complex surgery to straightforward procedures, we provide exceptional care across our network of hospitals, outpatient centres and specialist clinics.

Our facilities

From complex breast surgery to investigative breast procedures, we provide exceptional care across our network of hospitals, outpatient centres and specialist clinics.

This content is intended for general information only and does not replace the need for personal advice from a qualified health professional.
back to top