Dr Raju Kapoor

Consultant Neurologist

BMBCh, DM, FRCP

Specialty Neurology

Special interests General Neurology (including Parkinson's and headache) and Multiple Sclerosis

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About

  • Biography icon plus


    Dr Raj Kapoor is a Consultant Neurologist at the National Hospital for Neurology and Neurosurgery, Queen Square, and an Honorary Senior Lecturer at the Institute of Neurology. He is a general neurologist with wide ranging clinical interests, and a special research interest in multiple sclerosis. He regularly provides second opinions for patients from the UK and abroad with complex neurological problems, and has published over 70 articles, reviews and book chapters on conditions as diverse as headache, stroke, Parkinsons disease and MS, and has edited National recommendations on headache in NHS Evidence.

    Dr Kapoor graduated from Oxford University with first class Honours and qualified there in 1981. He did his postgraduate medical training in London at the Hammersmith, Brompton and National Heart Hospitals. He then did research on the neurobiology of brain function at New York University Medical Center and in the University Laboratory of Physiology in Oxford, where he was Junior Research Fellow at Pembroke College. He completed his neurological training at University College London Hospitals and the National Hospital, where he was appointed Consultant Neurologist in 1994. He was Associate Clinical Director of the National Hospital from 2001-3.

    Until 2008, Dr Kapoor was also attached to Northwick Park Hospital, where he ran the general neurological service and set up services for stroke, headache and motorneurone disease. At the National Hospital, he supervised the headache service, and then moved on to focus on the diagnosis and treatment of inflammatory disorders of the nervous system, particularly multiple sclerosis, on which he is a recognized expert.

    As well as his clinical contributions, Dr Kapoor is regularly invited to lecture on his work at conferences in Britain, Europe and North America. His research has shown how people with MS become disabled. Currently he is leading research on the cause and treatment of multiple sclerosis, with support of over 1 million from the American and British MS Societies, and from University College London.

  • Clinical interests icon plus

    General Neurology (including Parkinson's and headache) and Multiple Sclerosis

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